Cumbria broadband plans come into question again header image

Published: 22nd Jun 2016

More questions have been raised about the plans to bring super-fast broadband to Cumbria. 

South Lakes MP Tim Farron has revealed he has written to the communications minister Ed Vaizey asking for information to be disclosed about when and where BT will be providing an improved service through the Connected Cumbria scheme.

"The major problem that the contractual arrangements have failed to overcome is that BT and Cumbria County Council have been unwilling or unable to publicise the precise locations where the Connecting Cumbria programme will NOT deliver fast broadband connections," Mr Farron stated. 

The MP said it is important for this information to be made available, as it allows local people and businesses to look into alternative broadband solutions

"BT are using public money to deliver this project, so it's all the more important that they tell the public exactly what they are planning," he said.

Mr Farron revealed he has asked the communications minister to make it a statutory requirement for BT to reveal the exact locations where it will be delivering super-fast broadband. 

He said he will continue to campaign for rural areas to receive the same level of service available in large towns and cities. 

This is the latest in a long line of complaints about the Connected Cumbria scheme, with many people unhappy at the lack of information surrounding the project. 

A new coverage map was released for the programme in March, but was still seen as lacking the necessary detail to tell people if they will definitely receive an improved service or not. 

Indeed, this has been an issue that has been raised across the country, with many of the projects being carried out through the government's Broadband Delivery UK project seen as not providing enough information. 

This was one of the major criticisms of the scheme in the recent Public Accounts Committee report, which also accused the government of allowing BT to establish a monopoly in the rollout of super-fast broadband.