Cumbria MP welcomes Ofcom broadband switching plans header image

Published: 22nd Jun 2016

A Cumbrian MP has welcomed Ofcom's plans to make it easier for customers to switch their broadband provider. 

The telecommunications watchdog announced the new measures last month, which are designed to simplify the current system that often causes confusion for consumers. 

Under the new process, the company a person is switching to will be responsible for transferring their service, as opposed to the current method where the existing provider is in charge of the change and often delays or disrupts the move. 

Tim Farron, South Lakes MP, said he believes these plans will make things much easier for broadband customers and may help people in his constituency in particular.

"I have been campaigning for better broadband in Cumbria for many years, so it's good to hear that Ofcom are making it easier for local people to switch provider and get a better deal," the politician wrote on his personal website.

He said that while the main concern for people in the South Lakes is the lack of reliable broadband services altogether, those who do have a connection are often unable to shop around for a cheaper deal due to the confusing switching process.

"This move by Ofcom towards one clear and simple process led by the gaining provider is welcome news and means the switching process will now work in the best interests of the consumer," Mr Farron added.

Ofcom is expected to finalise it plans by early 2014 and they will be implemented a year later. 

This is certainly good news for the people of Cumbria, as broadband services are lacking in many parts of the county. 

In June, Mr Farron criticised the county council and BT's plans to introduce super-fast services to the region, telling in-cumbria the project "fails" the southern part of the area.

In light of this, Cumbria is an ideal location for Tooway satellite broadband, which can bring high-speed internet to remote areas within just a few weeks of an order being placed.

Posted by Mark Wynn