Poor broadband 'affects Guernsey education' header image

Published: 22nd Jun 2016

The internet has become a key tool in the education system and having online access is widely recognised as vital in fulfilling a child's learning potential. 

However, this means youngsters living in areas that are not well connected are at a disadvantage and at risk of falling behind children in other parts of the UK. 

One such location is Guernsey, where poor quality broadband is affecting the standard of education, according to the BBC. 

Barry Dickson, head of business and education systems for the States of Guernsey, told the broadcaster internet access on the island is some way behind that on the UK mainland.

"Teachers in local schools are reluctant to use the internet as a learning tool because of slow speeds.

"The island's ability to produce a workforce fit for the 21st century is being threatened as a result," he stated.

Residents of Guernsey will understandably be concerned by this news, as a lack of connectivity could have a serious impact on their children's prospects in later life.

However, the island is not the only part of the UK that suffers from this problem. Earlier this month, a study by education watchdog Estyn claimed more needs to be done to improve broadband services at schools in rural Wales.

It called on the government to take action to boost the level of online access schools can receive, as the standard of learning is currently hindered due to the lack of fast and reliable connections.

While education is one of the major reasons why better broadband is needed in areas such as Guernsey and rural Wales, there are other factors that should be considered. 

For example, the Guernsey Chamber of Commerce told the BBC that businesses on the island are currently at a disadvantage due to the poor level of service and are falling behind their foreign competitors.

A viable solution to the problems suffered in Guernsey and Wales is satellite broadband. Click here to find out about the benefits of this technology.

Posted by Craig Roberts